Last edited by Maramar
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

5 edition of An Address to the citizens of Philadelphia, on the subject of slavery found in the catalog.

An Address to the citizens of Philadelphia, on the subject of slavery

delivered on the 4th of 7th month, (July,) A.D. 1833

by Edwin P. (Edwin Pitt) Atlee

  • 247 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Cornell University Library .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History / United States / General

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11897570M
    ISBN 101429744936
    ISBN 109781429744935

    Background. Both the Boston Tea Party and the Philadelphia incident were the result of Americans being upset about Great Britain's decision to tax the American colonies despite a lack of representation in tax on tea particularly angered the colonists, so they boycotted English tea for several years, during which time merchants in several colonial cities resorted to smuggling tea. Connecticut Slave Sale Advertisements. The documents on this page are typical of advertisements offering slaves for sale in Connecticut colony. One ad, “A Likely Negro Boy 11 Years Old,” is noteworthy for the name of the seller: Benedict Arnold of Norwich All images on this page are from America’s Historical Newspapers, an Archive of Americana collection, published by Readex, a division.

    Book LWFSM for a Traveling Exhibit *Traveling Exhibit Fees Vary The Lest We Forget Traveling Slavery Museum brings slave artifacts, Jim Crow objects, bill-of-sale documents and much more to select venues throughout the United States and abroad. This compelling exhibit unveils portions of Am.   R eflecting on recent calls for stripping the name of Robert E. Lee, a slave owner who went to war in slavery’s defense, from Washington & Lee .

    address to all the colored citizens of the united states. by john b. meachum, pastor of the african baptist church, st. louis, mo. ethiopia shall soon stretch out her hands unto godps philadelphia: printed for the author, by king and baird. Address of the Female Anti­slavery Society of Philadelphia to the women of Pennsylvania: with the form of a petition to the Congress of the U. States. Call number: E A58 v no.4File Size: 2MB.


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An Address to the citizens of Philadelphia, on the subject of slavery by Edwin P. (Edwin Pitt) Atlee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Address to the citizens of Philadelphia, on the subject of slavery. Philadelphia, W.P. Gibbons, Printer, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Edwin P Atlee.

Philadelphia’s Dark Past: A History of Slavery Comes To On the subject of slavery book Philadelphia is affectionately known as the “City of Brotherly Love” and “Sisterly Affection”, however slavery of Africans has a long and troubled history here.

Airy historian Phillip Seitz, 55, in his book. Reader-Nominated Topic. Slavery and the slave trade were central to the history of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Philadelphia as the region economically benefited from the institution and dealt with tensions created by slave trading, slave holding, and abolitionism.

Philadelphia drank deeply from the cup of misery for more than three centuries. Slavery in Philadelphia documents the profits and suffering generated by this Northern city, beginning with the prominent families who purchased Africans to do their bidding.

In the late eighteenth century it was the center of the Mid-Atlantic grain trade, processing thousands of tons of slave-produced grain into /5(8). Book/Printed Material An address, delivered before the free people of color, in Philadelphia, New-York, and other cities, during the month of June, Enlarge View 17 images in sequence.

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends. Meeting for Sufferings. Address of the representatives of the religious Society of Friends, commonly called Quakers, in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, &c.

to the citizens of the United States. Philadelphia, J. & W. Kite, printers, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book. A petition to the Pennsylvania State Legislature by free black citizens of Philadelphia protesting their disenfranchised status as a result of the city's Convention of Included are testimonials about the fitness and fidelity of African American troops, etc., indicating.

American Slavery, American Freedom covers the history of Virginia from its founding past the establishment of the race-based slavery with copious primary source material. Through the material, Morgan explores the inherent conflict between the Age of Morgan is not only a revered and accomplished historian, he is a gifted writer/5().

British colony. After the founding of Pennsylvania inPhiladelphia became the region's main port for the import of slaves. Throughout the colony and state's history, the majority of slaves lived in or near that city.

Although most slaves were brought into the colony in small groups, in December the slave ship Isabella unloaded a cargo of slaves from Africa.

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends: An address to a portion of our southern brethren in the United States, on the subject of slavery, from a committee appointed to have charge of this subject by the yearly meeting of Friends, commonly called Quakers, held in Philadelphia in Philadelphia.

The region also houses court documents related to fugitive enslaved Africans, who sought free-dom from southern plantations and fled to Pennsylvania in the s and s.

Among these files are case documents for the Christiana Riot, one of the most significant U.S. anti-slavery incidents. The Problem of Slavery in Christian America aims at providing otherwise well-intended Christians and conservatives a deeper understanding of that history, a starting point for discussion and, if necessary, repentance, and with a biblical response to the larger problem of racism, all while refusing to capitulate to non-Christian leftism/5(26).

The Speeches, Addresses, and Messages of the Several Presidents of the United States at the Openings of Congress and at Their Respective Inaugurations; Also, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and Washington's Farewell Address to his Fellow-Citizens (Philadelphia: R.

Desilver, ), contrib. by George. When William Lloyd Garrison, the editor of the nation’s leading abolitionist paper, The Liberator, called for the organization of an American Anti-Slavery Society to take place in Philadelphia in the first week of DecemberLucretia Mott was thrilled.

As women, she and Lydia White, Esther Moore, and Sidney Ann Lewis could not be delegates, but they were permitted to observe the.

This hour, we’ll look into the history of slavery at Penn and in Philadelphia and discuss how to best address that history today. We’ll be joined by University of Pennsylvania history and gender studies professor KATHLEEN BROWN, who leads the Penn Slavery Project, and by Rutgers history professor ERICA ARMSTRONG DUNBAR.

Address to the citizens of Philadelphia, on the subject of slavery: delivered on the 4th of 7th month, (July,) A.D.An () available in print Address delivered before the Female Anti-slavery Society of Philadelphia: in the session room of the Second Presbyterian Church (on Cherry Street) in the first month, (January) to which is.

Unit 5 Slavery and AboliItion in Post-Revolutionary and Antebellum America, Unit 6 African Americans and the Civil War, Unit 7 The Reconstruction Era, Unit 8 The Rise of Jim Crow and the Nadir, Unit 9 World War I and the Great Migration,   About IBW IBW21 (The Institute of the Black World 21st Century) is committed to building the capacity of Black communities in the U.S.

to work for the social, political, economic and cultural upliftment, the development of the global Black community and an enhanced quality of life for all marginalized people. [Philadelphia, 8pp, folded, uncut and untrimmed, lightly spotted. Very Good. This scarce example of early campaign literature endorses candidates, and gives reasons for rejecting others, in the upcoming Pennsylvania general elections of Pennsylvania Hall, "one of the most commodious and splendid buildings in the city," was an abolitionist venue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, built in –It was a "Temple of Free Discussion", where antislavery, women's rights, and other reform lecturers could be heard.

Four days after it opened it was destroyed by arson, the work of an anti-abolitionist mob. Thomas Jefferson was born into the planter class of a "slave society," as defined by the historian Ira Berlin, in which slavery was the main means of labor production and elite slavemasters were the ruling class.

He was the son of Peter Jefferson, a prominent slaveholder and land speculator in Virginia, and Jane Randolph, granddaughter of English and Scots gentry.The Fourteenth Amendment establish equal rights and protection to all United States citizens. It covered citizenship, protection, legality, and equality that hadn't been an issue at the.

The final section of this law was even more remarkable—and stunningly progressive, even by modern standards. The law provided: That all Persons of Color in the District shall be subject and amenable to the same laws and ordinances as free white persons are or may be subject or amenable; that they shall be tried for any offences against the laws in the same manner as free white .